BFRCode

With the redesign of my robot BFR4WD complete I have moved back to developing the software to control the robot. As I have eluded to in previous posts, I have been working on a protocol for sending commands from the Raspberry Pi to the Arduino. The idea is that the Pi carries out the high level control, i.e. move forward 50cm, turn 30 degrees, etc. as well as image processing, and the Arduino is in charge of the low level control associated with these commands. I took inspiration from Gcode and started developing what I’m now calling BFRCode. I’m sure this isn’t a new idea but it is my take on it and I can tailor it to meet the requirements for my projects. BFRCode consists of a list of alpha-numeric command strings that can be sent by the Pi and interpreted and executed by the Arduino. The current list of commands (BFRCode_commands.xls), along with all of the other code I am working on can be found on github here. The command to move the robot forward 50cm for example would look like W1D50, a turn anti-clockwise of 30 degrees would be W3D30. I have also added functions for driving an arc shaped path and turning the robot to face a given direction as measured by the compass. The code also allows the head to be moved, sensor readings to be returned and power to the servos to be turned on and off. Currently all move commands return a status code to indicate if the move was completed successfully or not, as may be the case if an obstacle was encountered during the movement. The Arduino is in charge of detecting obstacles during movements.

This control scheme has the benefit of separating the high level control from the low level. Functions can be developed on the arduino and tested in isolation to make sure they do what they should and can simply be called by the python script running on the pi. Likewise, when developing the high level code on the Raspberry Pi, very little thought needs to be put in to moving the robot, just issue a command and check that it was executed correctly. Complex sequences of movements can be created by putting together a list of commands and storing as a text file, like you would expect from a Gcode file. A python script can then read through the file and issue the commands one at a time, checking each has completed successfully before issuing the next. I have found that sending strings with a newline termination is a very reliable method of exchanging data and can be done at a reasonably high baud rate. The other advantage to controlling the robot like this is that data is only sent between the Raspberry Pi and the Arduino when a command is issued or data is required. This is in contrast to previous approaches I have taken where data is constantly being sent back and forth.

To send commands, up until now,  I have been using a python script that I wrote that takes typed commands from the command line and sends them to the Arduino. This was OK but I decided I wanted a more user friendly and fun way to control the robot manually, for testing purposes and to show people what the robot can do whilst I’m working on more autonomous functions. I have started making a GUI in Tkinter that will send commands at the touch of a button. If I use VNC to connect to the Raspberry Pi it means I can control the robot manually using any device I choose (laptop, phone or tablet). I have also set the Raspberry Pi up as a wi-fi access point so I can access it without connecting to a network, ideal if I take to robot anywhere to show it off. Below is a screenshot of the GUI I am working on.

BFRGui

I created some custom graphics that are saved as .gif images so that a Tkinter canvas can display them. There are controls for moving and turning the robot and pan and tilt controls for the head. The compass graphic shows the current compass reading. If the compass graphic is clicked, the user can drag a line to a new bearing and on release of the mouse button, a command will be issued to turn the robot to the new heading. I have buttons for turning servo power on and off and a display showing the current sonar reading. I have incorporated a display for the image captured by the webcam. I am using OpenCV to grab the image and then converting it to be displayed on a Tkinter canvas. I’m really pleased with the way that BFRCode and the GUI are turning out. My 3 year old boy has had his first go at manually controlling a robot with the GUI and that is a success in itself!

I have made a very quick video of me controlling the robot using the GUI after connecting to the Raspberry Pi using VNC from a tablet.

Something I would like to develop is a BFRCode generator that allows a path to be drawn on the screen that can then be turned into a BFRCode file. The generated file could then be run by the robot. Head moves and image capture could be incorporated into the instructions. This could be useful for security robots that patrol an area in a fixed pattern. I am still very keen to develop some mapping software so the robot can then plot a map of its environment autonomously. The map could than be used in conjunction with the BFRCode generator to plot a path that relates to the real world.

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